Our Three Day Trek up Lombok’s Volcano, Mt Rinjani

Climbing Mt Rinjani

[by Mike] [Be prepared, this is a long one!]

A three day trek up the second largest volcano in Indonesia, pff, no problem. At least that’s how I felt reading the one paragraph blurb on Mt.Rinjani in our Lonely Planet guidebook, mango shake in hand, while baking on the white sand beach’s of Gili Trawangan, a laid back island off the coast of Lombok, Indonesia.

Climb Mt Rinjani

After taking the public boat from Gili T to Lombok we began negotiations with a local trekking company to secure our guide up the mount. I was originally picturing Ashley and I going guide-less, packing our gear and food (we were desperately ill equipped) up 3,723 meters of volcanic rock to the summit. Thank God the government put a law in place that bans vigilante trekkers. You must climb with a guide.

Two hours after landing in Lombok the negotiations came to a favourable close only after I agreed to throw in one of my personal t-shirts and a pair of Ashley’s pants to Wayan, the face of Rinjani Trekking Center. Wayan was twenty-eight, squat, with a streetwise face, baseball cap, and curiously sporting a tattoo of a Canadian flag on his left bicep, which I took as a good omen. After we paid the equivalent of three hundred dollars, which included a guide and porters to carry all equipment (food, tents, sleeping bags, mats etc.), a car whisked us away to the base of Rinjani for the night. The lack of research and the heavy clouds which masked the massive mountain was the perfect preparation, ignorance.

Climb Mt Rinjani

In ignorance we woke the next morning at 7:00am to a breakfast of banana pancakes and coffee that was to be the mornings fuel. We were introduced to our fellow sojourners: Michael, Kami, and Sophie, all young twenties and from Quebec. Team Canada was going to conquer Rinjani!

Finishing breakfast, our young, chain smoking, slight but sinewy guide Joe led us to the Mt.Rinjani registration office. In the office, a balding sweaty man sat officially at a tipsy desk, and smiled strangely as he recorded our willing consent to climb Rinjani. Our adventure had begun.

Climb Mt Rinjani

Rinjani starts you off gentle, the path winding hypnotically, gradient slowly increasing. Exotic bird calls and twisting jungle trees diffusing soft light gave us the right dose of trekking nostalgia and comfort to break us in slow.

By noon we were already starving, our un-trained muscles tired and ready for lunch. We took our break and were introduced to our three porters, Katchi, Suma and Meru. I am secretly in love with all three and here’s why: our porters climb Rinjani bi-weekly, carrying approximately 80 pounds of gear that is packed expertly into wicker baskets and securely fastened to a bamboo pole that cuts into the shoulder. I saw the bruises and scars this burden left. Climbing much faster than us, they set up camp and, squatting in dirt, cook breakfast lunch and dinner. We ate curries, noodle soups, fried rice with chicken, all delicious and nourishing. Every veggie was cut with a unique pattern and design. They do all this in flip-flops or bare feet. They made us feel like royalty but we all knew who the real kings of Rinjani were.

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

That first day we climbed a total of eight hours, the last five up steep stone steps. Our camp was set up on the crater rim, high enough to seat us above the clouds. It seemed the rest of the earth ceased to exist and that the large, cumulous clouds became our new terra firma. We watched mouths open as the sun dove behind the sea of white, yellow and orange rays spraying upward and running outward like spilled ink. We held our breath, beauty squeezing our lungs.

No matter how penetrating the views, or how tired our bodies, sleep seemed to escape us all night. We woke up to strong, sludgy Lombok coffee at seven am with blurry heads. It felt like our legs were disembodied in our sleep, used all night as punching bags, then stealthily reconnected. Pain was our only proof of this evil plot.

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

 

 

 

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

The first four hours of day two saw us down the crater rim. We arrived at the crater lake in a hazy shock. The lake is over two-hundred meters deep, ocean blue, and sitting low in the caldera which itself is over eight kilometres wide. The lake alone would be an incredible sight, but to completely blow the mind is a stereotypically cone shaped, deep purple and red volcano perfectly placed in the centre of the lake surrounded with frozen lava. One look and my pain was justified.

Locals line the banks patiently fishing, fires burning ready for the catch. A thought flashes through my mind, and I act on it. Approaching the friendliest looking local I ask, “Hello, how are you? Would it be ok if I tried your fishing rod?” (the question sinks in after some superb hand gesturing).

“Ok, Ok no problem.”

My new friend slides on a fresh a worm and hands me the rod. I flip the bail, pinch the line, and throw the tip towards the lake and let the line fly. The hook hit’s fifteen meters from shore. I began slowing reeling in and feel a slight tug, I instinctively tug back, the tip of my rod dips and the line pulls, fish on! I reel in the fish without struggle and hand my one pound beauty, all smiles and high fives, to my crater lake fishing brother.

“You good luck!” is shouted at me from tents as I float back to team Canada, my smile splitting my face. One cast, one fish, could it get any better? The answer is yes.

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Before lunch our guide led us over a creek and down a trail into a deep green valley with a heavy morning fog still wedged in. Below, tent’s dotted an open space with locals easily lingering around. A waterfall fell powerfully to our left. As we descended our eyes focused in on small steamy pools filled with bodies lazily floating around. Hot springs!! The pools were a foot deep each, tiering upwards towards the waterfall and rising in temperature the higher the pool. Just like the food, only the locals lingered in the highest and hottest pool. You could see the boiling water bubbling up through the red and yellow sulphur stained rocks. We stood under the cold waterfall, laughing at the madness of it’s power, and allowing gravity and water to massage our tired backs. We hopped from pool to pool over slimy rocks, all children again, finding the perfect temperature to soak our rubber legs. Some small fish were being dried on a rock near-by. I tried the hottest pool and the locals laughed at my pain. It was paradise.

Muscles melted, spirits lifted, and lunch eaten we returned to trekking reality and hit the trail for five more hours before reaching summit base camp.

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

On the final day we were to be woken up at 2am, have coffee and cookies (two of the five basic food groups on our trek) and begin the three to four hour climb to the summit for sunrise. We ate slowly that night, cracking jokes about our swollen muscles, encouraging each other that we could “do this” and all under the bright, wan light of a full moon. Kami said she saw a shooting star.

Climb Mt Rinjani

Two am came fast, and it was cold. The adrenaline seemed to be building through the night, no one had slept soundly. We threw sleeping bags into backpacks, drank our coffee, donned our headlamps and commanded heavy legs to move. It was a crisp, still morning, and we collectively thought this was the craziest thing we had ever done. We had no idea.

We had been warned in the hot springs by a group of Canadian doctors who had climbed the summit that morning, “It’s insane, I never want to hike again!” One of the physicians who was an experienced trekker sombrely claimed, “This is the hardest climb I have ever done.”

Sh*!.

Climb Mt Rinjani

The first hour saw us scrambling up loose rock, with finger like sandstone formations on each side. It was steep, and the loose rock caused us to slide backward with every step taken. Legs with twenty hours of hiking on them screamed in protest. Thankfully the punishment eased and we soon started to walk on a gently sloping ridge about a meter wide. Ashley and I assured ourselves that the worse must be over, and that the doctors were wimps.

We fell headlong into the ethereal romance of the moment. Full moon light bathed the mountain ridge, you could see city lights glowing ember to one side, and the moon in full reflection off the crater lake to the other. The moon light gave the shrubbery a muted glow, we felt we were walking on another, foreign world. We held hands tightly, and swore this wouldn’t be our last trek.

The pitch suddenly increased, there were no foot holds, just deep volcanic rock and dust. Your foot easily sank in to the ankles. We put our heads down and started to climb. It seemed harder to breathe. Was it the altitude? We slid backward with every step and had to take breaks often to shake rocks out of our shoes. It was steep enough that If you leaned slightly forward your cheek would touch the trail. Some were doubled over, hands on knees, backs heaving with breath. Others had quit and picked their place on the mountain ridge to view the sunrise. Where did the romance go? The shadowy, hooked peak of Rinjani seemed to mock our frailty. The peak was bowing over us, and we, humbled and breathless, felt small. We wished the doctors would have told us the truth!

Climb Mt Rinjani
After two hours of fighting for every inch of trail, the soft glow of sunrise extinguished stars and morphed the skies blackness to brightening blues. The changing sky gave us a stubborn energy, we had to make summit before sunrise!

Climb Mt Rinjani

Finally, the summit is in sight! Ash and I stumbled up at ten minutes after six, just in time, and took our seat with tired trekkers from every continent at over twelve thousand feet. Every soul here to witness the same miracle. I hugged Ash and told her how proud I was of her, her eyes looked tired and wet.

Thankfully the fog was slow to rise that morning; we had unobstructed views from the top of the world. Relaxed we felt the cold for the first time so we tucked our sleeping bag tightly around us and faced toward the sea. The sun rose strong, and clear, without the flashy colours of sunsets previous that faded softly into night. This sun was eager, tremulous with new energy it poured over the ocean horizon in full strength, shouting at the top of it’s lungs. We squinted in silence as pure gold rolled off dimpled sea, spreading life and colour as it went, and we felt alive.

Climb Mt Rinjani

Climb Mt Rinjani

We sat there tired but happy, equally conquerers and conquered. We had climbed the second largest but most difficult volcano in Indonesia.

Sitting in silence the tiny philosopher in me began contemplating obvious mountain analogies as the new sun broke unashamed over the sea.

If we never would have climbed Rinjani all we would have is the experience of a paragraph blurb about great views and volcanoes on a mango shake stained page in a lonely planet guide book. We can live comfortably through second hand information, entertaining TV shows, and someone else’s stories; or we can step outside, breathe clean air, and experience life’s adventures and wonders for ourselves.

I also thought about Ashley, and the mountain of marriage that is filled with crater lakes, grace filled views, and challenging climbs. I thought about how she is the best climbing partner and how you never get the wonder of the view without the climb.

I thought about our dream that was being fleshed out and the mountain we had climbed in frozen Canada to get here. You never get the view without the climb.

I thought about the dreams and challenges of the future, about our future kiddo’s, and how the view would be worth it.

The climb is hard, but the air is fresh, and the view can’t be bought.

 

 

 

our feet in tonsai thailand

Travel Rock Climb Tonsai Railay Beach Thailand

Travel Tonsai Thailand

Travel Tonsai Thailand

 

Travel Tonsai Thailand

Travel Tonsai Thailand

Rock Climb Tonsai Thailand

Rock Climbing in Tonsai Thailand

Travel Tonsai Railay beach Thailand

Travel Tonsai Thailand

Rock Climbing Tonsai Thailand

Rock Climbing Tonsai Thailand

Rock Climbing Tonsai Thailand

Travel Tonsai Thailand

Travel Tonsai Thailand

Rock Climb Tonsai Thailand

Rock Climbing in Tonsai Thailand

Travel Tonsai Thailand

Rock CLimbing in Tonsai Thailand

Deep Water Solo Thailand

Deep Water Solo Thailand

Deep Water Solo Thailand

Deep Water Solo Thailand

Deep Water Solo Thailand

Travel Tonsai Railay Beach Thailand

[Mike here] [This post is totally out of order but we didn’t want to miss filling you in on our time in Tonsai]

Ever since Ashley and I started rock climbing with the crew at Grip It gym in Saskatoon (and yes that’s a big shoutout!) the beachside karst cliffs of Tonsai, southern Thailand, loomed large in our minds. Our eyeballs were totally unprepared for the real thing.

After purchasing our ticket to take a long-tail boat from Ao Nang to Tonsai we waded waist deep into the water, heaved our bags aboard, climbed out of the Andaman Sea and took our seat. A long tail has a chunky diesel motor with a metal ‘long tail’ of about four meters jutting out the end that has a small prop attached. Watching the boat man swing the heavy motor around was nothing short of acrobatic. He swung the ‘long tail’ left, balanced tip toed on the edge of the boat, swung the beast hard the opposite way, pulled a string that was connected to the throttle, the engine coughed and barked and we were off.

A hilly, tropical forested peninsula is the only obstacle between Ao Nang and Tonsai. The long-tail takes ten minutes to chug around the peninsula, but in that ten minutes everything changes. Hundreds of feet tall, limestone cliffs come into sight. It’s as if the cliffs were formed of wax, a giant lighter melting them until they reached their maximum gothic potential. Stalagmites ten, twenty, fifty feet long hang heavy near dark caves scooped out of the sides. This is where Batman must have been born.

After our feet hit beach the ‘worries’ of the road became immediate, shelter and food (the third and most important being fun). As we walked into the forests of Tonsai in search of ‘shelter’ Ashley’s face changed from wonder and awe to “where the hell are we?” And I could understand why. If you are a heavy pot smoking Thai Rastafarian this is heaven. But for these two skinny jean loving, cappuccino drinking hipsters the empty rasta shacks of Tonsai in low-season came as a bit of a shock.

If sweat was a power source we could have lit up the world. Global energy crisis solved, we settled into the budget backpackers haven of Garden View with no garden to view. What a deal! The rooms were only ten dollars a night. Day by day we began to realise why it was only ten dollars a night and the budget backpackers haven began to morph into a hipsters nightmare.

Mosquitos materialized by the dozens at night, our bodies an insect buffet as we slept. To say that we had twenty plus bites per leg would be modest. Mosquitos, dirt spraying out of the shower head and the tiny windowed AC-less room could not stop us from enjoying the visual wonder and natural jungle gym that is Tonsai.

We met Noah, a big bearded North Carolinian pharmacy student and Sam, a small bearded Swiss mathematical genius, at a beachside bar. We shot pool on the dilapidated table held together with duct tape, drank Singha’s and talked climbing. We had made some friends and they invited us to climb with them over the next five days. That was such a treat because Ash and I are both unexperienced, we would have needed to hire a guide, and we don’t have the necessary climbing gear. We climbed all over Tonsai and Railay on these ethereal cliffs and swam in the Andaman to wash off the sweat. Noah and Sam are both sweet spirited adventurous souls and we wish them all the best!

The epic climbing made the nightmare of our accommodation melt like the karst cliffs of Tonsai. Still, Ashley’s semi relieved face when we boarded the long tail boat back to Ao Nang, and onward to Bali, primed her for the yoga panted, organic pampering that was to come :)

 

 

Ubud is my jam

Our Feet on the Earth - Ubud, Indonesia

Welcome to Bali.

Day two in Ubud and I don’t ever want to leave.

Somehow I knew I would love it here, I had that sense, and just hoped that it wasn’t some lovely fantasy that would turn out to be a popped bubble. And well, let me tell you, my feeling was right.

It’s everything I have loved about other towns but more. Healthy creative food, sweet cafe’s, yoga, entreprenuers, spirituality and culture. AND, its Indonesia…hello Bali.

Right now I am sitting in our outdoor living area in my still drying bathing suit and my tie-dye dress, overlooking our small pool and listening to the screech of a gecko. Lush green plants fill every corner of the courtyard while trees drop their fragrant flowers into the pool below.

We arrived in Bali just two nights ago, slipping out of Bangkok the morning after the military coup and the announcement of the nationwide curfew. We barely made it back to our Bangkok condo by 10pm, even though we technically had 3.5 hours to get there from when we first heard about the curfew. The streets were mania. Cars jammed back to back, scooters taking ever inch of spare space and hundreds of people walking up and down the sides. There was no way we were getting a taxi. We walked for hours;  you could feel the tension in the air, the buzz of a city on edge. After walking for about two hours, getting lost a couple times, stopping at the 7-11 for a Singha, and asking about a hundred people which way to go, our Air BnB host spotted us running across a highway (seriously, in ALL of Bangkok) and we quickly jumped (crammed) in the back of her car and made it back to the apartment with all our limbs. We flew to Indonesia the next morning at 6:15am.

I am learning about life on the road. And interestingly enough the lessons are the same as at home:

Take time for what’s important. Make space for your heart. Be attentive to Mike and I’s relationship. Take care of your body. Make sure to dream. Stay aware and thankful. Take advantage of every opportunity. Rest.

What are some lessons you are learning?

Peace, Ashley.

 

 

 

 

Our Feet in Koh Tao, Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

KohTao49

KohTao44

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

KohTao29 Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao ThailandTravel Koh Tao Thailand

Travel Koh Tao Thailand

 

 

Hey Guys, Ashley here.

I felt like our time on Koh Tao was breathtaking and adventurous, as well as a bit of a rough start. The island was beautiful but I ended up at the clinic a couple times and we were adjusting to the heat and sleeping with no a/c. Our bungalow was great, hot but great, and we paid $15/per night, which of course is insane. To sum it all up, I made a highlights and anti-highlights (that’s a word, right?) list for you.

HIGHLIGHTS

1// Scuba diving for the first time – the visibility wasn’t great on the days I went but it didn’t matter because the feeling of just hanging out in an underwater world was so rad

2// Coffee + reading in the mornings at Cafe Buddha

3// Renting a scooter and feeling the wind in my hair – There were two ways of getting “air conditioning”, riding on the scooter or jumping in the shower and standing naked in front of the fan. Even though the ocean looked refreshing it was 32 degrees and felt like getting into a hot bath. ha.

4// Finally finding a bathing suit to buy. I actually found it in Bangkok at the JJ Market just before we came to Koh Tao (an “H&M” bathing suit with a strap missing for $8)

5// Discovering electrolyte powder at the Pharmacy

6// Fruit Shakes and Chicken Sandwiches. We pretty much ate at the fruit shake and chicken sandwich lady’s stand everyday. So good! Mango for me, and something with banana for Mike

7// Just being by the ocean

8// Meeting some really sweet German friends and watching them get Bamboo tattoos (actually the tattoo shop had some of the nicest guys and became one of our hangout spots for our 11 days on the island)

9// Going on a night dive (Mike actually dove but I just came along on the boat) and being out on the ocean for the most beautiful sunset

10// Hiking to one of the viewpoints on the island. There is nothing like standing in a high place and overlooking paradise

 

Anti-Highlights 

1// Finding a scorpion by my pillow on the first night in our bungalow

2// Sunburns from snorkelling

3// Thinking I had decompression illness from diving for 2-3 days then finally realizing it was this Thai bugspray that was making my hands and feet numb

4// Getting an ear injury from blowing too hard when equalizing underwater

5// Adjusting to sleeping in the heat

We stayed on Koh Tao for a total of eleven nights. I would have liked to explore more of the nature, more hikes and more viewpoints, but the scuba classes keep you pretty busy. It is really scuba diving central, dive shop after dive shop. We ended up leaving earlier than planned because I had to take a week off diving with the ear injury and if you are not diving you are a bit out of place. Unless you are doing your Dive Master, most other people didn’t stay longer than three days. I completed my PADI Open Water course and Mike completed his Advanced Open Water as well as his Rescue Diver course (which was a crazy experience).

I would definitely recommend going there for a dive cert, it is so easy to take a course, and it is the cheapest place in the world to get certified. We dove with one of the smaller outfits, Sunshine Divers, in Chalok Bay on the quieter part of the island.

Good news is, we can dive anywhere now!

So much love to everyone at home! After Koh Tao we moved on to Tonsai (we will post about that soon), and now we have one more week before our Thai visa runs up so we are making our way back up the coast to Bangkok and then flying out to Indonesia.

Wi-fi has been a bit harder to come by then I thought, but hopefully we can post again soon!

~ Ashley

 

 

Our feet in Bangkok

Bangkok, Thailand, Our Feet on the Earth

Bangkok Our Feet on the Earth

After 3 flights, 2 layovers, with a total of 30 hrs of travel, Ashley and I walked out of Canada’s perpetual winter and into the sweltering heat of Bangkok, Thailand. We had finally made it! After all our preparation, saving, paying off debt, dreaming, and sometimes thinking it would never happen, our feet touched the land of our dreams. I smiled a big sweaty smile as I watched Ashley walk with a backpack as big as her. After getting off the airport link train at Phaya Thai station we descended the steep concrete staircase into the streets. The Bangkok city orchestra began to play for all of our senses; car horns honking, scooters manoeuvring effortlessly through impossible traffic, a wrinkled Thai man shouts from his shop doorway. Scooter taxi drivers lounge in hammocks tied to fences, lazily waiting for their next willing victim to ride the Bangkok roller coaster. Still others move with purpose, while some purpose not to move at all. It’s a sea of humanity, moving with tides of the ancient and modern.

Food carts line the streets sending smells of barbecued fish, spicy curries in every colour, fresh mangos, pineapple, papaya and strange fruits we had never seen, all wrapped in the thick humidity of this colourful city.

“Babe, a temple!” Ashley points down a seemingly random side street. The temple stands tall and skinny, golden and ornate, walls white with red wood trim that swirls at it’s ends. Soft monotone chanting surrounds the temple grounds while golden bells attached to the rooftop chime in the wind.

Sticking a hand up we hail down a cab. Opening the door we greet our cabbie with the only Thai we know, “Sawasdee cup” “hello”. We hand him a crinkled paper with Thai directions to our home for the next four days and throw the remainder of our earthly belongings into the back seat. As the cab pulls off the curb we slid our sticky hands together, looking at each other with eyes full of satisfaction for a dream fulfilled, minds swimming with anticipation for a journey just beginning, and hearts bursting with thankfulness for a God who is always faithful to our hearts.

 

 

 

 

10 Days + Rad Air BnB stays!

That’s right, 10 DAYS till our flight takes off for at least 8 months! Eek, that gets my nerves going. That means this week has been taxes, vaccinations, cancelling insurance and subscriptions, travel insurance…[aka Really Exciting Stuff].

BUT we did book our first few nights in Bangkok through Air BnB! We ended up booking a modern condo with a rooftop swimming pool for $28/night (geez, its gonna be rough).

If you have ever spent any time perusing Air BnB, there are some rad places to stay. Here are just a few of the beautiful places that are out there. Why would you ever want to stay in a hotel again?

 

Our Feet on the Earth

Our Feet on the Earth

Our Feet on the Earth

 

Daily Rituals

Our Feet on the Earth
*taken on my HOLGA last April in Mexico

I have realized something about myself.

I feel best when I take control of my days and don’t just let them happen to me. And you know what that means? Rituals and routines, which are scary words to me because it sounds like repetition (blah) and predictability (barf).

But that is SO not true.

Our Feet on the Earth
*taken on my HOLGA last April in Mexico

After reading this article by Joel Gascoigne 6 Simple Habits To Keep You Consistently Happy Every Day and inspired by an instagram post by Amber Rae where she says, “Basically, structure and process is a creative’s best friend”, I decided to narrow down the daily rituals that I know make me happy.

Our Feet on the Earth
 *taken on my HOLGA last April in Mexico

So far, here are my  this-is-gonna-be-a-good-day rituals:

1) Get up early : the hardest one, and if this doesn’t happen the others are more likely to be skipped
2) Yoga
3) Morning quiet, reading and journal time : Especially after a yoga session this is the time where I feel most inspired and in touch with my true self
4) Quality time : I have come to realize this is my number one love language and my desire for real connection  is huge. Even 5 minutes of face to face quality connection with Mike is so fulfilling

NOW the hard part is figuring out how to keep this up while on the road.

Any suggestions? What are your daily rituals?

*these pictures are taken on a HOLGA last April in Mexico 

 

the journey here

Our Feet on the Earth

It’s one month before our plane leaves to take us on our 8 month journey through SE Asia. We have just made the drive from Saskatoon to BC and said goodbye to the prairies and hello to a new chapter in our life.

Our Feet on the Earth

Just over a year and a half ago we left home with a mission to work hard, pay off debt and save money to go travelling. First of all, this all came about because of an unexpected change in our career and community, but what looked like a terrible thing turned out to be just what we needed. Don’t you love it when you can say that in hindsight?

Our Feet on the Earth

Anyway, Mike likes to say that for the last 1.5 years he worked hard and I worked (so true!), and our goals came true. As we drove the truck through the Rocky Mountains we reflected on how INSANELY freeing it feels to have no debt, money in the bank and plans to go on our next adventure! Whoa!

Our Feet on the Earth
I will let you guys in on all our South East Asia plans soon! For now, more pics of the trip to BC.

Our Feet on the Earth

Our Feet on the Earth

Our Feet on the Earth

Our Feet on the Earth

 

 

Hey Friends!

muchomuchobuenobueno
Brad launching off a gazebo roof on a snow skate.

Hey Friends. Mike and I are about to embark on an 8 month quest through South East Asia! Our Feet on the Earth will follow our physical feet as we adventure as well as be a space to share our thoughts on our collective mark that we all seek to leave on this earth. We want to leave a mark of inspiration, creativity, expression, adventure, health and love.

Look forward to our field notes, adventures of our own and others, tunes we are currently jamming to, design and creative inspiration and soulful thoughts along the journey.

You can subscribe at the top right of the blog, and get updates in your email.

Peace Out!

Mike + Ashley